EIGHT YEARS EXPERIENCE AND OBSERVATIONS IN THE CULTURE OF THE MULBERRY TREE, AND IN THE CARE OF THE SILK WORM. Samuel Whitmarsh.

EIGHT YEARS EXPERIENCE AND OBSERVATIONS IN THE CULTURE OF THE MULBERRY TREE, AND IN THE CARE OF THE SILK WORM.

Northampton: J. H. Butler, 1839. Folding engraved frontispiece of the interior of a cocoonery + 156 pages. 8vo, gilt-printed embossed cloth; light foxing; frontispiece complete but creased. Item #411

First edition. The American silk industry after the Revolution was distinctly a domestic endeavor, with family farms rarely producing over 100 pounds per annum. Congress tried to control imports with various results. During the 1830's a short-lived 'morus multicaulus' craze swept the country when thousands of mulberry trees were planted and many cocooneries were built. Thousands of speculators and private buyers were ruined with the financial disaster of 1837. In 1844 a blight effected most of the Mulberry trees in America and the silk industry quickly became an import industry, never again to develop on these shores.

The above is an example of the instructive volumes aimed at the American grower, issued at the end of this agricultural craze. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 59213.

Price: $250.00

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